The slippery slope: plant rights


#1

Liberals are now campaigning for plant rights

If proposals calling for rights for animals are on the table, why not rights for other living things? Plants, for instance.

the future of nonhuman rights
Championing Life And Liberty For Animals
After all, plants can sometimes exhibit humanlike behavior. And we’re not just talking about the butterwort-flytrap hybrid in The Little Shop of Horrors. Some plants respond well to music. Some “smell” other plants. Still others seem to shrink away when touched.

Plants display remedial types of memory and possess “anoetic consciousness” — the ability of an organism to sense and to react to stimulation — writes Daniel Chamovitz in his 2012 book, What a Plant Knows: A Field Guide to the Senses.

And, according to recent reports from a research team led by Australian biologist Monica Gagliano, some plants (such as chili peppers) may be able to “hear” other plants (such as sweet fennel). “We know that plants recognize what is growing next to them,” Gagliano says in the University of Western Australia’s University News. “There is chemical communication between them. Plants can warn other plants of a predator by releasing a chemical, and the warned plants can release chemicals to make themselves unpalatable to the predator.”

She says, “I think we might realize that plants are more sensitive than we think.”

Sensitive enough to deserve rights? Some people think so.

In 2013, the Pennsylvania-based Nonhuman Rights Project, led by attorney Steven Wise, plans to file a series of lawsuits in hopes that one high court in one American state will finally recognize that a nonhuman plaintiff can be a legal “person” in the eyes of the law.

If Wise and his group are successful, they will break new ground by securing humanlike rights for nonhumans. The result could open all kinds of possibilities for the rights of other nonhuman entities.

Advocates for plant rights and robot rights are already planning for the future. If they eventually succeed, it could bring sweeping changes to the way we live. This three-part series on the Future of Nonhuman Rights explores the people and ideas that may bring radical change to legal systems — and societies — around the world.

Recognizing The Right Of Plants To Evolve : NPR


#2

Do you have an actual argument to the link you provided or is it just wrong because you say it is?

It brings up some interesting points. However, this pretty much sums it up:

“If plants are not sentient — if they have no subjective awareness — then they have no interests,” Francione says. “That is, they cannot desire, or want, or prefer anything.”

Therefore, Francione says, “I do believe that we have an obligation not to eat more plants than we need to live, but that is because I think that overeating is a form of violence to our own bodies. I also believe that we have an obligation to all sentient inhabitants of the planet not to use more non-sentient resources than we need. In both cases, we have obligations that concern plants but these obligations are not owed directly to plants.”

In sum, he says: “I reject completely the notion that we can have direct moral obligations to plants. I reject completely that plants have any interests whatsoever.”

If the plant doesn’t care what happens to it, then why should we?


#3

[quote=“Trekky0623, post:2, topic:36838”]
Do you have an actual argument to the link you provided or is it just wrong because you say it is?
[/quote]It shouldn’t even need an argument.


#4

Liberals always create constituencies that cannot protest their “help” and Liberals have been worshiping trees for decades so I don’t see how this is anything new.

Liberals have destroyed most of the logging industry on the West Coast because they believe it is immoral to utilize the forests as the renewable resource it is, men with non government jobs are really the only living entity that Liberals don’t think have “Rights”.


#5

Awesome, yes give plants rights. “No I can not eat my Brussel sprouts that’s murder”. No I can’t mow the lawn that’s murder".


#6

The resource isn’t renewable if the rate that you’re cutting down trees exceeds the rate that it can repopulate itself. We’ve seen this happen with fisheries as well as with forests, water, whatever. It’s the tragedy of the commons.


#7

ZURICH – For years, Swiss scientists have blithely created genetically modified rice, corn and apples. But did they ever stop to consider just how humiliating such experiments may be to plants?

That’s a question they must now ask. Last spring, this small Alpine nation began mandating that geneticists conduct their research without trampling on a plant’s dignity.
Switzerland’s Green Power Revolution: Ethicists Ponder Plants’ Rights - WSJ.com


#8

[quote=“Trekky0623, post:6, topic:36838”]
The resource isn’t renewable if the rate that you’re cutting down trees exceeds the rate that it can repopulate itself. We’ve seen this happen with fisheries as well as with forests, water, whatever. It’s the tragedy of the commons.
[/quote]Which doesn’t really mean it’s not renewable. It’s definitely renewable. Even when the rate of harvest exceeds the rate of repopulation, it’s still renewable. The forest isn’t magically incapable of regenerating.

And there’s a solution to the “tragedy of the commons” with forests.


#9

That’s crazy talk. Trees do not drop seeds to grow new trees. The plants we have at this second are the only plants we will ever have… THE SKY IS FALLING!!!


#10

[quote=“Dacabeti, post:9, topic:36838”]
That’s crazy talk. Trees do not drop seeds to grow new trees. The plants we have at this second are the only plants we will ever have… THE SKY IS FALLING!!!
[/quote]Really?! I’m convinced. The ecoweenies in Eugene have had it right all along.

PS I’m sorry I said anything that might offend a tree.


#11

This afternoon I spent with my chainsaw, and I will the rest of the week, cut over 200 cords of wood, am I gonna go to jail?

Suprised the libtards are behind this as plants don’t vote or at least not yet


#12

[quote=“17Oaks, post:11, topic:36838”]
This afternoon I spent with my chainsaw, and I will the rest of the week, cut over 200 cords of wood, am I gonna go to jail?

Suprised the libtards are behind this as plants don’t vote or at least not yet
[/quote]Maybe we’ll see a proposal to allow them to vote via a self-appointed proxy.


#13

And we had been growing timber faster than we were cutting it for decades when the Nazi’s shut down logging, anyone who claims U.S. logging depleted forests is a lying S.O.B. fit for nothing better than a wood chipper.


#14

[quote=“RET423, post:13, topic:36838”]
And we had been growing timber faster than we were cutting it for decades when the Nazi’s shut down logging, anyone who claims U.S. logging depleted forests is a lying S.O.B. fit for nothing better than a wood chipper.
[/quote]Yessir.


#15

When a tree falls in the forest, does it yell in fear, or go boling? why they just leave and branch out into a different part of the forest. Some just crotch down and hide from the Bushes who may be lurking there.


#16

FACTOID: 12 acres of land forested like found from E Texas thru Ga, Tenn, SE US. will support a family unit forever for heat and cooking if the land is managed.

Here is another fact. I am cutting like crazy around the house area. I have old Oaks and I cut out to the drip line of the Oak and clear all the suckers, and Texas Cedar. Then where I do not have oaks, I cut down cedar that looks like a bush vs a tree. Cedar if fine, good tree, but does consume a lot of water and is near impossible to kill off. It also grows like a week, dry or wet, hot or cold. I started over a year ago and I am AMAZED at how much growth came back, I am cutting in places I clear last year. I put about 100 cords +/- in the pond (dry). We have so much limestone that the pond will not hold water long before it seeps out. So you load it up with wood, burn it and the ashes will begin filling the holes and gaps in the limestone. If that does not work well enough then I can dump in a few truck loads of drilling mud and it will seal it up, I hope to start burning later this year.


#17

Not cool brehs, not cool at all. Killing plants man is wrong, they have feelings.

Seriously though, Did these humans reason themselves out of existence? All I have to say to them is if you believe it then By all means follow through with your logic. Stop eating plants and animals. Darwinism will help us out here.


#18

Other countries do not, though, and I was not singling out the U.S. Further, cutting down trees does other stuff to the environment besides deplete trees, like destroy habitats for animals and force them to relocate, which can have effects on the ecosystem as a whole.


#19

[quote=“Trekky0623, post:18, topic:36838”]
Other countries do not, though, and I was not singling out the U.S. Further, cutting down trees does other stuff to the environment besides deplete trees, like destroy habitats for animals and force them to relocate, which can have effects on the ecosystem as a whole.
[/quote]


#20

Do you doubt that cutting down trees has an effect on the ecosystem?