Unions say hike taxes to pay for their pensions


#1

Illinois’ largest public employee unions don’t want to raise just one tax to pay for the state’s sky-rocketing pension debt, they want to increase as many as they can.

Monday’s nearly three hour closed-door pension summit hosted by the We are One Illinois Coalition, a group that includes the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, the Illinois Federation of Teachers, the Illinois Education Association and the state’s AFL-CIO, focused almost exclusively on raising taxes as a way to pay for Illinois’ $130-billion pension debt and nearly $8-billion annual pension payment.

Snip:

Democrats in Springfield pushed through a “temporary” income tax on people and businesses in 2011, but that tax is set to expire on the first day of 2015. Noland said, the pension crisis may trump the need to let the “temporary” tax fade away.

“If we were to extend this, (people) would be paying the same,” Noland said. “If we were to say, look this is what this is ear-marked for … I think (people) would be open to it.”

Noland said the “temporary” tax would not be made permanent. Rather, he said, lawmakers would extend the tax for 15 to 30 years, or until Illinois paid off its $130 billion pension debt.

Unions say hike taxes to pay for their pensions | FOX 55/27 Illinois | Illinois
Having been in the state union, I know that the politicians brought this on. As for temporary taxes been there done that before with Illinois. Once a politician gets it passed that tax stays.


#2

Tempory tax = Lucy not pulling the football away when Charlie Brown goes to kick it…


#3

A company I used to work for cancelled my health insurance supplement, and replaced it with an annual spending account to help with insurance and/or 'scrips. This changed affected every (excepting, I presume, high-level management personnel) company retiree - except for union members. They had their solid contract.


#4

[quote=“Susanna, post:3, topic:39832”]
A company I used to work for cancelled my health insurance supplement, and replaced it with an annual spending account to help with insurance and/or 'scrips. This changed affected every (excepting, I presume, high-level management personnel) company retiree - except for union members. They had their solid contract.
[/quote]There is a big debate going on about pensions in Illinois but you have to remember many of these politicians fear that if they vote the wrong way the unions will remove them from office. Keep in mind while all this is going on the state is still spending money on pet projects while sreaming poverty. The state is still moving forward on the third airport the airlines say they do not want, high speed rail, more benefits for illegals, more goodies for gays. Frankly I have no remorse because I know that the state failed to include their portion of funding on the pensions they agreed to and that they even removed money that did not belong to them. You know how politics is played.

I paid social security and into the pension while I was working. Now you realize those same politicians do not mention their pensions and do not want to strip their members of such. Heck George Ryan’s pension was $197,037 a year