Very cool optical illusion


#1

Ok…some of you techno-dweebs need to explain how this works!!

The Coolest Optical Illusion You


#2

It’s just a picture printed on paper to make it look 3d


#3

If you like this, you should see some of the effects from Lord of the Rings:

How “Lord of the Rings” used forced perspective shots with a moving camera. [VIDEO]


#4

Talking about Illusions … This one has always interested me!

square A is exactly the same shade of grey as square B


#5

Prove it.


#6

[quote=“ClassicalTeacher, post:5, topic:37338”]
Prove it.
[/quote] You’ll have to do that yourself.
(I had to)
The way to do it is this: You can take a piece of paper and make two small holes on it, the distance between the two holes should be the same as the distance between square A and B, the holes should be small enough to allow you to see only the center of each square without the edges of the squares.

Place the paper over the A and B squares and look through the 2 separate holes and you will see that both squares have the exactly the same shade of grey color.

Only because the surrounding of each square has different colors does it give you the impression that square A and B are two different colors.


#7

why dont you prove that they arent, not that you would believe it but here is the A and B photoshoped next to each other

http://img707.imageshack.us/img707/9384/52316286.gif


#8

Someone on another forum made it easier to show ‘proof’.

His post was …

You really do not need that complex of a picture to demonstrate the illusion.

See attached pic where I cut out just a section of the picture.

On the left, they still look a different colour.
Then I copy and pasted each block
on an all white back ground (same border colours now)
The colours are now the same.

It is the border colour difference and the gradient in between,
that makes the human eye think it is different.

Interesting, to say the least.

http://i45.tinypic.com/2n00h38.jpg

btw: The posters name (user name) is irman and I inforrmed him that I was using his post!


#9

I take it that the OP is hard to convince of things?
(I’m new to the board but I’ll learn)


#10

no its not a commentary on the OP but just people in general once they have made up their minds they rarely change them. Especially the tone of the post, it wasnt: “wow thats hard to believe” or “im not sure they are really the same shade” it was an emphatic “prove it”


#11

Thank you.

I did take it as a “you’re making that up” reply and that’s why I went searching for that last post.

Funny how you and the poster from the other forum used the same technique to ‘prove’ it!


#12

btw: Even after seeing the proof … I Still have a hard time believing it!


#13

FYI: My “prove it” comment was not meant because I didn’t believe it. I wanted him to prove it because although I couldn’t SEE the difference, I knew that both squares were the same color and I wanted to SEE it with my own eyes. Geesh… I think it would be nice if you could at least give some of us the benefit of the doubt before you jump to rash judgments.

The other comments were very helpful and I thank you for responding. I knew that somehow although the colors of the squares LOOKED different, that there must be something in the projection of the picture (perhaps the shaded areas & the color green–which sometimes translates into red in our eyes) could be the culprits. Thanks for a very interesting puzzle! I like these kinds of things! Really…!


#14

Thanks! I knew it had to be some kind of optical illusion. I’ve seen similar things like this. I just wanted to find out WHY. Our eyes often deceive us, don’t they? holy sheep


#15

I can readily believe it without the isolated comparison on account of my experience with messing around with my Clam images in Paint.