We must inflict economic pain on powerful - for civil rights!


#1

We must inflict economic pain on those in power in order to usher in a new civil rights movement

A few months ago while attending Netroots Nation 2016 in St. Louis, Missouri, I shared an Uber with former Ohio State Senator Nina Turner and Georgia state Senate candidate Tamara Johnson Shealey. Together, we visited the site where Michael Brown died at the hands of police officer Darren Wilson.

Retired police detective Marq Claxton appeared on MSNBC with some poignant statements.

“First of all, I have a huge problem with some of the genuflection that goes on towards police,” Claxton said. "It is time for us to stop this thing about lionizing police. And I am talking as from a professional police officer, retired now for several years. I was a volunteer. I wasn’t a victim. I was a volunteer.

I think it’s time for us to stop providing excuses and stop providing the disclaimer even when you criticize the police by saying 90 percent of police do a great job. These things are a given. It is time for us to really address the issues that concern a large segment of our society without having to lionize and bow down before police officers.

Police officers reflect society. They bring their prejudices into their job like anyone else. The difference is that those biases affect their judgment. Unless laws and rules are modified to jail them for instituting their prejudices, nothing will change.

What will it take to correct failed policing in America? The lack of empathy by our society requires subjecting us all to some sort of discomfort. That is the importance of Black Lives Matter and other organizations bringing this issue to the forefront.
While any action taken must be peaceful, it must speak the only language that seems to effect change in this country: There has to be economic pain inflicted on those who hold the power to institute change.


#2

I think it’s time for us to stop providing excuses and stop providing the disclaimer even when you criticize the police by saying 90 percent of police do a great job. These things are a given. It is time for us to really address the issues that concern a large segment of our society without having to lionize and bow down before police officers.
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First off to my way of thinking 99% of police officers do a great job & I do think that it’s wise to remind people of that. It does seem that inner city blacks don’t understand that at all or possibly they are just using a shooting as an excuse to loot & burn.
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As far as bringing their prejudices to the job, I think that does happen some. But I think a lot more prejudices are created on the job because they deal with some of the scum of the earth on a daily basis.
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Perspective. Sure it’s a horrible thing if even one person is shot wrongfully. But if BLM actually believes that black lives do matter then they should put the police shooting on the back burner & address the major problem where most blacks are being killed & that’s black on black killings.
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And if I traveled in a uber or for that matter any other confined space with a politician or someone that had been a politician I would have made sure that I still had my wallet when I got out.
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My feelings are that I’m TIRED of this white guilt that everyone seems to say that I should be feeling. You see I’ve never had a black slave, stolen from a black, shot a black or done anything to a black person that I wouldn’t do to a white person (or indian). Black people are people and are no more special than any other color people. Some are good & some are bad but no race out there should be treated different than any other race. And as a matter of fact treating a race of people differently is in my mind part of the actions of someone that prejudice.
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#3

I guess that I’ll add this too: My local police in perspective do a lot more to protect me than the president of the U.S… To me they deserve more respect than he does.


#4

With respect to police I will be very blunt. I have respect for police. They are doing a thankless job. It takes the right kind of person to have to deal with the crap that they do. Having said that it is a job, and not a job that they were forced into. They choose this career path just like most others do in their jobs. I rarely thank people for doing their job nor do I expect others to thank me for doing mine.

I respect them but not to the point where I will defend them if they are in the wrong. I think alot of the problems revolve around hiring practices and staffing. I think some wrong people(not bad just not suited to be police) are being hired and in some area there is just too much crime for the cops to handle. They have to respond to every incident and when you do not have enough people on things can get stressful. Not everyone handles stress well.


#5

:howler:


#6

While I was a detective some years back, I was responsible for arresting and prosecuting two officers from the same department…one for burglary and one for beating a DUI suspect after he’d been handcuffed. One did time and the other was summarily fired and subject to a civil suit, which he lost…a very expensive lesson. Every other office I encountered was above reproach. One moved on to eventually become chief of police at D/FW Airport, one moved to another city, lost a foot and lower leg to gunfire and later retired after serving 20 years as a federal court bailiff. I went on to design an associate degree program in Criminal Justice and teach some of the classes before moving on to the oil and gas industry.