Wonder who this illegal alein will vote for?


#1

He’s defied U.S, Law to get his education, why wouldn’t he vote? Hell, he could have been voting for years in Tampa.
FEBRUARY 11, 2013 Undocumented immigrant will be State of the Union guest of Rep. Kathy CastorRep. Kathy Castor is bringing with her to the State of the Union an undocumented immigrant from Tampa who is seeking admission to the Florida Bar to practice law.
From a previous story: “Born in Mexico, Jose Godinez-Samperio has lived in Tampa since he was nine years old. He is a graduate of Armwood High in Tampa, New College in Sarasota and Florida State University law school, and he has passed the Florida Bar exam, but the Florida Board of Bar Examiners hasn’t issued him a license to practice law. When he asked for a waiver of a requirement to document his citizenship status, the bar examiners requested advice from the Supreme Court.” … Read more

Wanna bet he’ll get a license in Florida?


#2

No question he will. That’s Flori-DUH for you.


#3

Yes it is, but that only applies to Tallahassee/Leon County and South and East of the Suwanee River. Ever since I can remember, real Florida ‘Crackers’ have been saying Florida should be cut into two States at the Suwanee River.


#4

Hmmm…that sounds reasonable! :beerchug:


#5

Um, he was nine years old and came with his parents. Are we going to insult him and blame him for something he didn’t do?


#6

hes not 9 anymore, hes a full grown man and he still chooses to stay in the US breaking the law and now a congresswoman is aiding and abetting his crimes.


#7

I don’t deny that he should apply for citizenship and denied the rights of a citizen until he has, including being denied the BAR, but I don’t like the fact that some in here are insulting him. It’s not his fault. Would you go back to Mexico if your parents brought you here, after you’ve already been accepted to college and started going to school here? I wouldn’t. Maybe that makes me a lawbreaker, but it certainly isn’t his fault that he is here in the first place.


#8

[quote=“UNTRugby, post:6, topic:38192”]
hes not 9 anymore, hes a full grown man and he still chooses to stay in the US breaking the law and now a congresswoman is aiding and abetting his crimes.
[/quote] Crimes? Again, he was nine nine years old and had no control over being brought here. Are we going to insult him and blame him for something he didn’t do?


#9

[QUOTE=OldStyleBlues;572348]Crimes? Again, he was nine nine years old and had no control over being brought here. Are we going to insult him and blame him for something he didn’t do?[/QUOTE

He was 11 once. He was 14 once. He was 16 once. he was 18 once. Blah, Blah, Blah. HE’S EFFING ILLEGALLY IN THIS COUNTRY. WHAT PART OF THAT DON’T YOU GET??


#10

But at what point should we expect…no…DEMAND personal responsibility from an adult legal or illegal? That is part of the problem in this country…and unless we DEMAND absolute personal responsibility from everyone, this country will NEVER prosper again.


#11

So when he was 14, He shoulda said “sorry folks, I’m going back to Mexico cause I’m a criminal!”? Give me a break. He’s a productive member of society that’s made somthing out of himself and I applaud him for that. I’m sure He’ll end up going through the path to citizenship process. Condeming him cause he didn’t “run back across the border” at 14 years old is pretty low.


#12

That part about blaming him for coming here in the first place. Would you have returned to Mexico at 18 years old, risking never coming back here, leaving friends behind, and possibly facing legal repercussions? I think many of you wouldn’t. That’s a big thing to ask of an 18 year old.


#13

Those without integrity often would break the law as long it helps them


#14

:no: :Thud: :pieface:


#15

Would you have returned to Mexico at 18? Does an 18 year old even have the necessary funds to live by himself or move across the border and survive at 18? You’re asking him to essentially sacrifice his well being for something his parents did. Nobody here can honestly claim they wouldn’t have stayed here if given the chance.


#16

Trekky: Forgive me for repeating myself. But, my grandfather came to this country as an uneducated immigrant from Italy when he was 9 years old. His father had no education and no job skills outside of gathering wood with a donkey in the Naplitano mountains. There were no ESL programs, no welfare, no food stamps, no NOTHING. Both my grandfather and great-grandfather respected this country and its citizens–the law. They did things lawfully. Both became naturalized citizens. But, their lives were anything but easy. They lived in the poorest Italian neighborhood in Chicago. My grandfather sold newspapers on the streets of Chicago for a penny. When he married at 19 he was doing exactly what his father had done–he was digging ditches. For 10 years, he worked during the day and went to school at night to obtain his grade school and high school diplomas. He never complained and I never in my entire life heard him say that things were “unfair” even though he had been passed over for job promotions until the company HAD to promote him almost 20 years later. He was discriminated against because he was a “dirty Italian immigrant”. I never heard him ever complain–EVER. THAT is what immigrants do if they are HONORABLE.


#17

[quote=“ClassicalTeacher, post:16, topic:38192”]
Trekky: Forgive me for repeating myself. But, my grandfather came to this country as an uneducated immigrant from Italy when he was 9 years old. His father had no education and no job skills outside of gathering wood with a donkey in the Naplitano mountains. There were no ESL programs, no welfare, no food stamps, no NOTHING. Both my grandfather and great-grandfather respected this country and its citizens–the law. They did things lawfully. Both became naturalized citizens. But, their lives were anything but easy. They lived in the poorest Italian neighborhood in Chicago. My grandfather sold newspapers on the streets of Chicago for a penny. When he married at 19 he was doing exactly what his father had done–he was digging ditches. For 10 years, he worked during the day and went to school at night to obtain his grade school and high school diplomas. He never complained and I never in my entire life heard him say that things were “unfair” even though he had been passed over for job promotions until the company HAD to promote him almost 20 years later. He was discriminated against because he was a “dirty Italian immigrant”. I never heard him ever complain–EVER. THAT is what immigrants do if they are HONORABLE.
[/quote] This guy towed the mark. He went to law school and obviously worked for a living. We don’t know his circumstances and shouldn’t pass judgement on him going through the citizenship process as of yet. My guess is it’s in the works and he’ll jump through the hoops to get there. But he’s done a hell of alot more with his life than many US citizens.


#18

At the same time, if your great-grandparents had brought your grandfather here illegally, and your grandfather stayed her to live his life later, would you blame him for something his parents did? There’s not a single way your 18-year-old grandfather would have been able to go back to Italy under those circumstances and come here legally. He would have been truly stuck. It just doesn’t make sense to blame him for that. If a person is a hostage and gets involved in a car chase, is he blamed for the actions of the criminals?


#19

I have no doubt you believe that, you have shown your moral compass to change with the wind. I would go back, no doubt.


#20

For you bleating hearts:
IT"S THE LAW, DON’T LIKE IT? CHANGE IT! AFTER ALL WE ARE THE PEOPLE REFERED TO WHEN IT’S QUOTED, “GOVERNMENT OF THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE, FOR THE PEOPLE”.
QUIT MAKING EXCUSES AND CHANGE IT…GETERDONE! But, stop attacking me for wanting the LAW enforced!!:banghead: