Wow! I wonder if this is possible...


#1

Well, all I can say is that this is unprecedented–at least since SC back in the 19th century.

15 states start petitons to leave the USA


#2

New Jersey is welcome to take Philly with them.


#3

I’m signing the petition.


#4

It is interesting to note that many of the states signing the petition come from states that overwhelmingly supported BO.


#5

I want to secede, I will sign.

We don’t need the “president’s” approval, since if we considered the government legitimate, we wouldn’t want to secede.


#6

I think, for the first time, I can understand why many people reject the legitimacy of the government.


#7

Are we headed for another civil war–Red vs. Blue States?


#8

I think more “rural vs city” - and which group is the most likely to be well-armed?


#9

And somewhat hilariously, someone in North Dakota filed a petition requesting New York secede

Wut?


#10

I believe that this is exactly what will happen. It may not happen now or in ten years, or even 50 years, but it will happen.


#11

Battle of Armageddon.


#12

Yup. No doubt.


#13

I’m not sure if I support secession, I would like to see the Union preserved, but then again, if states like Texas secede, they might actually put in place sensible economic policies, or maybe even outlaw abortion, it would be great.


#14

More and more Texas looks pretty darn appealing! One question though: How would we keep the illegals out?


#15

The will of the people cannot be ignored forever, you know. We have a President who constantly thumbs his nose at the Constitution and basically dares us to do something about it.

He mocks America and The Lord


#16

Citizens in states, citizens being the keyword. I live in Colorado and there is no sign of anyone wanting to secede. What are the chances that these people signing an internet petition actually want to become their own sovereign nation? Zero. This will not happen.


#17

If Texas secedes we don’t want none of you Yankees moving down here unless you’re helping move out Dallas, Houston and San Antonio. T


#18

Seravee: I’m not sure I understand what you mean. What do you mean by “helping move out Dallas, Houston and San Antonio”? If Texas should miraculously manage to secede, I’m moving fer sure! :wave:


#19

Here’s what will happen, realistically.

First off, these petitions are merely that, petitions. The White House promises to address petitions that get 25,000 signatures (and some of these are struggling just to get that many), and their response is going to be a roundabout way of saying, “Heck no.” Mostly because states don’t have the right to secede.

When, therefore, Texas became one of the United States, she entered into an indissoluble relation. All the obligations of perpetual union, and all the guaranties of republican government in the Union, attached at once to the State. The act which consummated her admission into the Union was something more than a compact; it was the incorporation of a new member into the political body. And it was final. The union between Texas and the other States was as complete, as perpetual, and as indissoluble as the union between the original States. There was no place for reconsideration or revocation, except through revolution or through consent of the States.

And it will be squashed and some people will be mad at Obama until a Republican victory makes them happy again. Certainly nothing to secede over.

But let’s assume they do continue to fight for secession. In that case, the national guard is going to roll up and blockade the state in question. We’re talking military equipment. After a while the U.S. will start accepting refugees from the renegade state. Should the state continue to try and secede, the national guard and military are going to roll in. People have guns in Texas and Tennessee, but they won’t match up against tanks and machine guns. The rebellion will be squashed and the people who led it will be sentenced, probably to life or death. Then the state begins reconstruction.

The chances of that happening are nil, though, because these states don’t want to secede.

Having the president you don’t like elected is not a legitimate grounds for secession. If some essential rights were being grossly violated, maybe, but they aren’t. And if a revolution were to happen for legitimate reasons, you can be sure that other nations would stand behind the revolters in the same way France stood behind the colonies. But this is silly, so no one is going to support them. And these states aren’t going to give up federal funding and government programs simply because Obama was elected and not Romney. Can the people of Texas or Tennessee live without social security? What about welfare? A military? What about funding for their budget? FEMA? Medicare or medicaid? Not to mention the 99% of people in the state that want to stay in the Union.

These people don’t want to secede. Not really. They just want a different president, and have lashed out irrationally on an Internet petition because of it.


#20

I think this is just total garbage. The last secession resulted in a country split down the middle. The biggest issue was states rights (i.e. the ability to keep, use, and trade human beings as slaves) This was no ordinary political split, either. It took one of the bloodiest wars in US history to get it back together again.

Now the issue over which secession is being threatened is Obama winning. The biggest issue within this being Obamacare. I find it totally ridiculous that states want to secede from the union, go through the difficulty of starting their own nation, and risk a civil war over… healthcare. Isn’t this just cheapening the act of secession? Letting our children know that this is how we respond to losing?

This is totally ridiculous