Yale bigots demand Firing


#1

Tensions at Yale University hit a boiling point yesterday after an email about Halloween costumes created a week-long controversy on campus.
Students called for the resignation of Associate Master of Silliman College Erika Christakis after sheresponded to an email from the school’s Intercultural Affairs Council asking students to be thoughtful about the cultural implications of their Halloween costumes. According to The Washington Post*, students are also calling for the resignation of her husband, Master of Silliman College, Nicholas Christakis, who defended her statement.

So an administrator says to be sensitive and they demand her firing as well as her husband. Yes they are the true bigots demanding this nonsense.*


#2

You are joking? Right?


#3

Nope. Think of this in this way, she asked them to be conscious of others sensitivity because we know that there is always someone who will protest be some imagined slight. We are seeing attacks on free speech daily by those who want to tell us what to think and how to act. She was pointing out that keeping that thought in mind would spare them some grief.

How these college students should be aware of the ramifications of deliberately offending someone. By the time you reach college it is expected you should start acting like adults and realize there are consequences to actions. Free speech aside, think before you talk or act and for this they want her and the husband fired.

I would be interested in how many of these students actually agree with those calling for the firing or is this another media attempt to paint a false narrative.


#4

Actually, I think someone misread the OP. The people the students want FIRED are those who “responded inappropriately” to a call from something called “The Intercultural Affairs Council” (whatever THAT is) asking everyone to be “culturally sensitive” in their Halloween costumes.


#5

[quote=“Pappadave, post:4, topic:47641”]
Actually, I think someone misread the OP. The people the students want FIRED are those who “responded inappropriately” to a call from something called “The Intercultural Affairs Council” (whatever THAT is) asking everyone to be “culturally sensitive” in their Halloween costumes.
[/quote]True I may be wrong on this. After a little sleep from a long day at yard work I realize I got it backwards. She was calling for people not to be so sensitive and and that brought on the anger of those who blow up every expression as a direct affront to their sensibilities. They want to control the actions of others. In a sense I am still right that as one grows into adulthood one must be tolerant of others up to a point and not get upset by every little thing. When I posted the article I was thinking of the two recent incidents where a popular event was cancelled because they called it Taco night and another because they wore mexican sombreros. What next we can not do things because muslims do not like it–oh wait that is happening also.

Face it haven’t we had similar discussions before with the likes of those who said we could not say Merry Christmas because it offended them? How about the controversy about the Redskins where one of those complaining recently wore black face?

[LIST]
[*]

[]From: Erika Christakis
Date: Friday, October 30, 2015
Subject: Dressing Yourselves
To: "All Silliman Students and Admin."

Dear Sillimanders:
Nicholas and I have heard from a number of students who were frustrated by the mass email sent to the student body about appropriate Halloweenwear. I’ve always found Halloween an interesting embodiment of more general adult worries about young people. As some of you may be aware, I teach a class on “The Concept of the Problem Child,” and I was speaking with some of my students yesterday about the ways in which Halloween – traditionally a day of subversion for children and young people – is also an occasion for adults to exert their control.

When I was young, adults were freaked out by the specter of Halloween candy poisoned by lunatics, or spiked with razor blades (despite the absence of a single recorded case of such an event). Now, we’ve grown to fear the sugary candy itself. And this year, we seem afraid that college students are unable to decide how to dress themselves on Halloween.
I don’t wish to trivialize genuine concerns about cultural and personal representation, and other challenges to our lived experience in a plural community. I know that many decent people have proposed guidelines on Halloween costumes from a spirit of avoiding hurt and offense. I laud those goals, in theory, as most of us do. But in practice, I wonder if we should reflect more transparently, as a community, on the consequences of an institutional (which is to say: bureaucratic and administrative) exercise of implied control over college students.
It seems to me that we can have this discussion of costumes on many levels: we can talk about complex issues of identify, free speech, cultural appropriation, and virtue “signalling.” But I wanted to share my thoughts with you from a totally different angle, as an educator concerned with the developmental stages of childhood and young adulthood.
As a former preschool teacher, for example, it is hard for me to give credence to a claim that there is something objectionably “appropriative” about a blondehaired child’s wanting to be Mulan for a day. Pretend play is the foundation of most cognitive tasks, and it seems to me that we want to be in the business of encouraging the exercise of imagination, not constraining it. I suppose we could agree that there is a difference between fantasizing about an individual character vs. appropriating a culture, wholesale, the latter of which could be seen as (tacky)(offensive)(jejeune)(hurtful), take your pick. But, then, I wonder what is the statute of limitations on dreaming of dressing as Tiana the Frog Princess if you aren’t a black girl from New Orleans? Is it okay if you are eight, but not 18? I don’t know the answer to these questions; they seem unanswerable. Or at the least, they put us on slippery terrain that I, for one, prefer not to cross.*
Which is my point. I don’t, actually, trust myself to foist my Halloweenish standards and motives on others. I can’t defend them anymore than you could defend yours. Why do we dress up on Halloween, anyway? Should we start explaining that too? I’ve always been a good mimic and I enjoy accents. I love to travel, too, and have been to every continent but Antarctica. When I lived in Bangladesh, I bought a sari because it was beautiful, even though I looked stupid in it and never wore it once. Am I fetishizing and appropriating others’ cultural experiences? Probably. But I really, really like them too.
Even if we could agree on how to avoid offense – and I’ll note that no one around campus seems overly concerned about the offense taken by religiously conservative folks to skinrevealing costumes – I wonder, and I am not trying to be provocative: Is there no room anymore for a child or young person to be a little bit obnoxious… a little bit inappropriate or provocative or, yes, offensive? American universities were once a safe space not only for maturation but also for a certain regressive, or even transgressive, experience;increasingly, it seems, they have become places of censure and prohibition. And the censure and prohibition come from above, not from yourselves! Are we all okay with this transfer of power? Have we lost faith in young people’s capacity – in your capacity * to exercise selfcensure, through social norming, and also in your capacity to ignore or reject things that trouble you? We tend to view this shift from individual to institutional agency as a tradeoff between libertarian vs. liberal values (“liberal” in the American, not European sense of the word).**
Nicholas says, if you don’t like a costume someone is wearing, look away, or tell them you are offended. Talk to each other. Free speech and the ability to tolerate offence are the hallmarks of a free and open society.
But – again, speaking as a child development specialist – I think there might be something missing in our discourse about the exercise of free speech (including how we dress ourselves) on campus, and it is this: What does this debate about Halloween costumes say about our view of young adults, of their strength and judgment?
In other words: Whose business is it to control the forms of costumes of young people? It’s not mine, I know that.
Happy Halloween.
****Yours sincerely, ****

[/LIST]


#6

Yup - Halloween is traditionally a “day of subversion”. And on today’s campuses, the established order is political correctness, enforced by petty commissars.

Smash the “state”!


#7

Christakis committed an unforgivable sin, asking activists to replace their hypersensitive paranoia with a sense of humor. Sadly, she also reveals, in her letter, that she does not understand the hypersensitive paranoids who have been attacking her. They want to destroy her career, destroy her husband’s career, to the third and fourth generation, and their little dog, too.

Welcome to academia!

Sad as this incident is (and it could get sadder!) in isolation, it illustrates why many conservatives have very qualified respect (or less!) for academia and universities.


#8

College students have always practiced the art of navel-gazing, and today the grievance-mongering fad is what these kids are attracted to. What I’ll be watching is how the Yale faculty and administration defends, if they defend, Christakis. That e-mail exhibited wisdom, perspective, and even grace, and if an academic institution allows a mob to take down a true and deliberate scholar, then I have given my last dime.


#9

I hope to be proven wrong, but I doubt Yale will back them.

FWIW, I largely concur on the email’s content. I just don’t think it fits the audience.


#10

Preaching common sense to the ignorant masses?! The gall!!


#11

I have been reading more about this story
these students in their zeal to act stupid fail to see that their actions will have consequences in the future when it comes to jobs as well as relating to people. It is not unusual for job applicants to have to provide email and social contacts from what I have read. Prospective employers will not be to eager to hire a troublemaker who has a history of causing a stir and possibly involving a business in legal actions because their little itty bitty feelings were hurt.


#12

From the Atlantic: The New Intolerance of Student Activism


#13

Like it said in the article, the left’s agenda has come full circle.
Idiocy such as this will relegate the “Land of the free and the home of the brave” to the status of a fairy tale!!


#14

I guess I couldn’t dress up as Aunt Jemima at that college.


#15

Speaking of costumes, who’s that scrotum-faced guy next to you in your avatar?


#16

[quote=“Jazzhead, post:15, topic:47641”]
Speaking of costumes, who’s that scrotum-faced guy next to you in your avatar?
[/quote] My friend/ former coworker, who is the at home mascot for the N.O. Saints. Sir Saint.

The other mascot is the dog, Gumbo.


#17

do you know who has been put in as interim administrator. LoL

How about this…don’t you think it’s funny that all these university students are showing us their special little snowflake status? all at the same time?


#18

I am sure some nutjob will complain that the image of a imaginary woman who represented good food will offend them because somehow it is a stereotype even though women who portrayed them were beloven in the movies.


#19

MU News Bureau | MU News Bureau

COLUMBIA, Mo. *— University of Missouri Provost Garnett Stokes announced today that Chuck Henson, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Trial Practice in the MU School of Law, has been named as Interim Vice Chancellor for Inclusion, Diversity and Equity, effective immediately.
“We’re pleased that Professor Henson has agreed to serve in this very important and crucial role at our university,” Stokes said. “We’re looking forward to working with him as we continue to make Mizzou an inclusive and welcoming community for everyone who teaches, works and studies here.”
Henson has been with the university since 2009. During that time, he has served as an adjunct professor, visiting professor of law and trial practice professor of law. He was an honoree at the 27th Annual Lloyd Gaines Scholarship Banquet and received the Graduate Professional Council’s 2014 Gold Chalk Award for excellence in teaching. He was recognized for his outstanding contributions to student learning in 2015 by the Division of Student Affairs Excellence in Education Award.
His academic scholarship focuses on Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin. He also has taught continuing legal education courses focusing on employment discrimination.
Prior to joining MU, he served as an assistant attorney general and the assistant general counsel for human resources in the Missouri Attorney General’s office. From 2004-2006, he was a vice president with Adelphia Communications, providing legal guidance and management for human resources issues with 15,000 employees in 23 states. He also has worked in private practice in Colorado. He is a licensed lawyer in Missouri and Colorado (inactive) and is licensed to practice before a variety of federal district and circuit courts of appeals including the U.S. Tax Court; the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals; and the U.S. Supreme Court.
He received his bachelor’s degree from Yale University and his law degree from Georgetown University.
Editor’s note: Media wishing to interview Henson or Stokes should contact Christian Basi at BasiC@missouri.edu or 573-882-4430.


#20

[quote=“Caroline, post:19, topic:47641”]
MU News Bureau | MU News Bureau

COLUMBIA, Mo. *— University of Missouri Provost Garnett Stokes announced today that Chuck Henson, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Trial Practice in the MU School of Law, has been named as Interim Vice Chancellor for Inclusion, Diversity and Equity, effective immediately.
“We’re pleased that Professor Henson has agreed to serve in this very important and crucial role at our university,” Stokes said. “We’re looking forward to working with him as we continue to make Mizzou an inclusive and welcoming community for everyone who teaches, works and studies here.”
Henson has been with the university since 2009. During that time, he has served as an adjunct professor, visiting professor of law and trial practice professor of law. He was an honoree at the 27th Annual Lloyd Gaines Scholarship Banquet and received the Graduate Professional Council’s 2014 Gold Chalk Award for excellence in teaching. He was recognized for his outstanding contributions to student learning in 2015 by the Division of Student Affairs Excellence in Education Award.
His academic scholarship focuses on Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin. He also has taught continuing legal education courses focusing on employment discrimination.
Prior to joining MU, he served as an assistant attorney general and the assistant general counsel for human resources in the Missouri Attorney General’s office. From 2004-2006, he was a vice president with Adelphia Communications, providing legal guidance and management for human resources issues with 15,000 employees in 23 states. He also has worked in private practice in Colorado. He is a licensed lawyer in Missouri and Colorado (inactive) and is licensed to practice before a variety of federal district and circuit courts of appeals including the U.S. Tax Court; the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals; and the U.S. Supreme Court.
He received his bachelor’s degree from Yale University and his law degree from Georgetown University.
Editor’s note: Media wishing to interview Henson or Stokes should contact Christian Basi at BasiC@missouri.edu or 573-882-4430.
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